BS in Hospitality and Tourism

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Hospitality and Tourism Degree Program

The concentration in Hospitality and Tourism prepares students for professions within the wide array of hospitality and tourism including lodging, food service, tourism, and recreation related industries. The curriculum supports this objective by integrating technology, leadership, and case analysis of the hospitality and tourism global industry. The program is designed for individuals seeking entry into the hospitality and tourism profession, and those currently in the hospitality and tourism industry seeking to enhance their skills and ability to advance into supervisory or management positions.

To achieve the objective of this program, the following learning outcomes have been established:

  1. Students will analyze and articulate the individual’s role in different communities, including local, national, and global communities.
  2. Students will apply the methods of specific quantitative and qualitative disciplines to the analysis of problems, information, and interpretation.
  3. Students will communicate persuasively in a genre appropriate to purpose and audience.
  4. Students will evaluate, synthesize and apply evidence to construct creative and well-reasoned arguments or problem-solving strategies.

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Program Details

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

  • Applicants will be considered for admission if they satisfy the following:
  • Submit a high school diploma or a GED
  • Submit a completed admissions application,
  • Submit a $100 nonrefundable application fee,
  • Submit an updated resume,
  • Submit a personal statement that describes the applicant’s professional accomplishments and goals.
  • Copy of valid government issued ID
  • Online students must have access to the Internet

* Students applying for the graduate program must also submit a copy of their official transcripts from their undergraduate program.

TRANSFER FROM ON CAMPUS PROGRAM TO ONLINE PROGRAM

Since the classes in both formats are the same, students will be able to take classes online or on campus to fit their schedule. There are no additional fees for taking a class online. However, a student will not be able to start and class in one format and change to another format in the same semester. If a student chooses on-campus one semester and wants to change to online the following semester the student will have to complete a change of status form and it has to be approved by the Executive Director.

CHANGE OF PROGRAM OR MAJOR

Students who contemplate a change from one program or major to another should discuss this possibility with the Executive Director to determine the effect such a change would make on the student’s satisfactory academic progress. The university defines satisfactory academic progress as completion of the total program in no more than 1.5 times the number of semesters described in this catalog for the program. All credits attempted count toward the total program length of 1.5 times the number of semesters required for completion of the major program.

If a student changes his/her major or program only the credits that are common to both programs may be accepted toward the new degree program.

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS POLICY

All students are required to meet the standards of academic performance that are outlined in the sections below and they are evaluated regularly to determine that the standards are met. These standards have multiple components: a minimum cumulative grade point average requirement (CGPA); a minimum successful completion rate based on all credit hours attempted; and, a maximum time frame requirement to successfully complete all required credit hours for the program. As described below, each student must achieve the minimum CGPA within the maximum time frame established, achieving the required completion rate of 75% at each evaluation point. Failure to meet these standards may result in dismissal from the academic program and in ineligibility to earn the BS in Hospitality and Tourism Degree.

MAXIMUM TIME FRAME (MTF) BACHELORS IN HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM

Students who adhere to their assigned class schedules and achieve the minimum passing scores or standards in their theory classes and core classes will complete the BS in Hospitality and Tourism degree program in 120 credits. For any student who, for any reason, has not remained on track with his or her studies, the maximum time frame (MTF) to successfully complete the program is 180 credits.

The MTF, which is 1.5 times the normal completion time of 120 credits, is computed from the very first semester in which the student enrolled and originally began his or her studies at Okan International University. Any student who does not successfully complete the BS in Hospitality and Tourism degree program within the 180 credits MTF cannot earn BS in Hospitality and Tourism Degree.

The MTF for transfer students will be adjusted individually according to the total number of credits they successfully transferred into the program. The total number of credits the transfer student needs to complete the Okan International University degree program will be multiplied by 1.5 to determine that student’s MTF.

COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM

The course numbering system consists of an alpha prefix followed by a digit course number. The Alpha Prefix identifies the academic discipline and the first digit specifies if the course belongs to an upper or lower division. The following digits are reserved for departmental use in indicating sequence of courses.

Concentration Courses per Program:

  • HAS     Healthcare Management
  • MBA    Master in Business Administration
  • HFT     Hospitality and Tourism
  • BA        Business Administration

First number indicates if the course belongs to an upper or lower division:

  • 1 = Lower division Courses
  • 2 = Lower division Courses
  • 3 = Upper Courses
  • 4 = Upper Courses
  • 5 = Upper Division Course in Masters

CREDIT HOURS

Credit hours are awarded on a semester basis according to the successful completion of coursework for which the student has registered. The successful completion of one unit of credit is equivalent to the following total clock hours per semester:

1 lecture credit = 15 hours
1 laboratory credit = 30 hours
1 internship/externship or practicum credit = 45 hours

BS IN HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM
Total Credits 120
Cost Total per Credit Hour: $500.00

Application Fee: $100.00 (Nonrefundable)

Graduation Fee: $250.00

Admission Requirements · Submit a High School Diploma or a GED

· Submit a completed Admissions Application,

· Submit a $100 nonrefundable application fee,

· Submit an updated Resume,

· Submit a personal statement that describes the applicant’s professional accomplishments and goals.

· Copy of valid government issued ID

Program Objective The objective of the program is to assess, develop and apply requisite competencies of Hospitality and Tourism Management, to include accounting and finance, cost controls, event planning and management, restaurant operations, sanitation and safety practices, travel and tourism planning and management/leadership and hospitality law. The student will analyze, evaluate and solve managerial problems that utilize quantitative reasoning concepts, critical thinking in all sectors of the hospitality industry in a global, cultural and diverse society. The student will also evaluate leadership and ethical decision-making competencies based on standards set by the industry.
Program Description The BS in Hospitality and Tourism Management is designed to prepare students for management careers within the hospitality and tourism industry. The student will develop a solid knowledge of hospitality and tourism business operations and effective leadership and management skills. The student will be equipped with the skills, knowledge, and experience required for success in the hospitality and tourism industry. The student will increase their skills in analysis and problem solving and will be ready to apply their learning in today’s global business environment.
Program Course Descriptions
Course # Course Title and Description

* Denotes General Education Course

SFS 100 STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS SEMINAR (3 credits)

SFS100 is designed to assist students with learning skills that are essential for academic success in college. Students will be taught a variety of learning skills and strategies that will enable them to experience success in college classes and beyond. By applying principles taught throughout the semester, students will become independent learners and will maximize their educational experience.

ENC 120 COLLEGE COMPOSITION I * (3 credits)

ENC 120 is a college-level writing course that introduces students to various forms of academic discourse. Students are required to prepare essays in a variety of rhetorical modes, including exposition, description and argumentation. In addition to out-of-class writing assignments, students will be required to compose in-class essays in response to readings and other prompts. ENC 120 introduces students to process-writing techniques, library research and APA documentation procedures. The primary focus of ENC 120 is to help students acquire the writing skills they need to succeed in an academic environment.

ENC 121 COLLEGE COMPOSITION II * (3 credits)

ENC 121 is the sequel to ENC 120. This course concentrates on argumentative writing and requires students to prepare a major research report, one that reveals fluency with argumentative strategies and rhetorical conventions. In addition, students are introduced to analytical reading techniques, critical research methods and current documentation procedures. Although other kinds of writing are commonly assigned in ENC 121, argumentation remains the major focus of study.
Prerequisite(s): ENC 120

SPC 260 ORAL COMMUNICATIONS * (3 credits)

This course helps a student develop his or her abilities and skills in expression and the spoken language. Students apply the techniques of oral exposition and learn to distinguish between the different techniques used in organized oral discussions.

PREREQUISITE: ENC 120

MAC 105 COLLEGE MATHEMATICS I * (3 credits)

This course provides a general introduction to college mathematics. Students learn the following mathematical concepts in a logical sequence that increases in difficulty as students gain command of a concept: polynomials, equations, inequalities, the straight line, Cartesian coordinates, functions and graphs, systems of linear equations, logarithms and exponentials, matrix algebra, limit of a function, and derivate of a function and integral.

MAC 114 COLLEGE MATHEMATICS II * (3 credits)

This course provides students with the methodologies required to understand the role played by the inductive method in this field of Mathematics. Trigonometric functions, identities and conditional equations, solution of triangles, trigonometric forms of complex numbers are all taught.

STA 240/MAT 240 APPLIED STATISTICS * (3 credits)

This is a fundamental course in the application of statistics. In this course, students will learn to apply statistical techniques to a variety of applications in business and the social sciences. Students will learn how to solve statistical problems by hand and through the use of computer software. Topics include probability distribution functions, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing and linear regression.

PHI 210 CRITICAL THINKING * (3 credits)

This course helps students develop strategies for “learning to think” and “thinking for learning”, using a variety of methods and resources to question their thoughts and their ways of expression, the intention behind what they say, its meaning, and its relationship to their beliefs. Students develop an ideological framework for assessing whether they have a solid and legitimate foundation for such thoughts and expressions.

PSY 201 INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY * (3 credits)

This course places an emphasis on behavior and the factors that influence it, as well as on describing the cognitive, affective and personality factors that make up behavior. The knowledge acquired by the students in this course will provide them with a holistic view of man and serve as the basis for understanding other courses related to behavioral science.

SOC 201 INTRO TO SOCIOLOGY * (3 credits)

Students should understand their role in society and be capable of interpreting the social phenomena surrounding them. This course provides students with a basic understanding of how the society functions, and specifically how groups work.

 

GEO 200 WORLD GEOGRAPHY * (3 credits)

This course examines the implications of global location and topography for the people of planet Earth. Students will explore how geography shapes the dynamics of human societies, with an emphasis on the geo environmental, geopolitical, and geo social phenomena that help to define the modern world.

ARH 250 ART HISTORY * (3 credits)

The course provides students with a general foundation in sequential and thematic knowledge of the great moments in Art, Architecture, and Culture throughout history, from the earliest times to the present.

ENV 101 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE * (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to the scientific aspects of the environmental field. The first part of the course introduces students to the foundations of environmental science, while the second part concentrates on the application of these foundations to real life environmental problems. Therefore, the course not only engages the fundamentals of environmental science but also shows students how science informs sustainability, environmental policies, economics and personal choice.

HRM 301 INTRODUCTION TO HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course welcomes students into the exciting and diverse hospitality and tourism industry. While providing an understanding of the scope and complexity of the industry, the course covers key hospitality issues, management definitions, and career opportunities available in restaurants, hotels, beverages operations, casinos, theme venues, entertainment centers, cruise lines, and countless other hospitality and tourism business.

HRM 302 SANITATION AND SAFETY (3 credits)

Covers the principles and practices of sanitation and hygiene as applied to the food service industry, emphasizing the training of supervisory personnel in sanitation procedures.

HRM 303 DINING ROOM MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course examines the detailed operation of a restaurant dining room. Topics include types of table service, dining room organization and table settings, staffing, responsibilities of dining room personnel, customer sales and service, and the design and usage of menus.

HRM 313 TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY (3 credits)

Introduces the basic and specific use of computers in the hospitality industry; provides hands-on use and knowledge of software and information systems used in the various hospitality industry operations.

HRM 304 ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM (3 credits)

This course explores the many exciting opportunities available for individuals interested in opening a restaurant, bar, hotel, or other hospitality and tourism business. Topics include entrepreneurial characteristics, assessing the viability of small hospitality and tourism business ventures, risks, the business planning process, feasibility studies, formation of business plans, the management of small enterprises, record keeping, and personnel management.

HRM 305 PRINCIPLES OF HOSPITALITY FRANCHISE MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course examines franchising in the hospitality industry from both the franchiser and franchisee’s point of view. Students examine start-up, organization, franchiser/franchisee relations, cooperative marketing, legal issues, and daily operations, with an orientation toward the small business franchisee in a variety of hospitality and tourism businesses.

HRM 306 TOURISM PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT (3 credits)

This course teaches students how to identify, develop, and promote tourism and hospitality products and services. Issues such as marketing, sales, advertising, and promotion for the tourism and hospitality industry will be explored, along with basic planning and financial topics. Case studies will be used to illustrate both areas of opportunity and challenges to product development.

HRM 307 SUSTAINABILITY IN TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY (3 credits)

This course provides students with a general overview of issues related to the sustainable planning and management of tourism and hospitality businesses. Concepts such as planning, conservation of resources, monitoring and assessment, environmental audits, visitor management, and green building construction and retrofits will be discussed. The course also provides a larger global and regional perspective on sustainability issues related to tourism, such as the impact of travel on global climate change.

HRM 308 GLOBAL ISSUES IN TRAVEL & TOURISM (3 credits)

As one of the world’s largest industries, and one that brings travelers and host communities into close contact, tourism and travel are rife with challenges. This course delves into these issues from a social science perspective, showing how tourism affects travelers and communities in complex and contentious ways, from commoditization of art forms to sex tourism, drug use, and changes in local economies and culture. It also explores the connection of tourism to global issues such as infectious diseases, climate change, and terrorism.

HRM 309 SUSTAINABLE HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This class focuses on the practical applications of sustainability principles and techniques to the planning and management of tourism and hospitality businesses. Taught by faculty experienced in designing and implementing sustainable hospitality guidelines, it will take students through the steps of assessing planned or existing businesses and making or recommending steps to make these businesses more environmentally sustainable. State, national, and international guidelines for sustainable businesses will be examined.

HUM 350 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course is geared towards two fundamental aspects: a. the introduction of students to the ideas, theories, concepts and approaches of this area of management; and b. the demonstration and guidance of students in the application and implementation of programs and studies in human resources management.

HRM 400 LEGAL ISSUES IN HOSPITALTIY AND TOURISM (3 credits)

This course examines the common and statutory law of the hospitality and tourism industry in the United States. Included are discussions of the duties and responsibilities of hospitality and tourism businesses to guests, including duties to maintain property, receive travelers and assume various liabilities for guests’ property. The legal environment and issues of the hotel, restaurant and travel industry will be discussed and analyzed. Ways of preventing and responding to legal situations as an executive in the hospitality and tourism industry will be identified and evaluated.

HRM 401 TRENDS AND INNOVATION IN TOURISM & HOSPITALITY (3 credits)

Students will be introduced to major trends and innovations in contemporary tourism and hospitality, with a focus on identifying opportunities in the industry. In addition to studying global and national trends in travel, the course will look at specific innovations that create new prospects for tourism in the region or demand for new types of products such as green tourism.

HRM 402 HOSPITALITY NEGOTIATION AND SALES (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of the legal, ethical, and practical environment that impacts the negotiation of meeting contracts and the execution of the events that they represent. It examines the strategies of negotiation and sales.

HRM 403 HOSPITALITY FOR PROFIT (3 credits)

This course concentrates on the analysis and interpretation of the hospitality and tourism industry accounting procedures and financial statements. Balance sheets, income statements, and cash flow statements will be covered. Principles of budgeting, forecasting, pricing techniques, financial ratios and financial management case problems explicit to the hotel, restaurant, tourism, and meeting industries are studied.

HRM 404 HOSPITALITY STRATEGY AND BUSINESS PLAN (3 credits)

This course provides the student with the major elements of a successful concept package and business plan for a proposed hospitality operation. Criteria for site selection, market analysis, location factors, and menu consistent with concept are covered. Forecasting, budgeting, and controlling sales and costs, financing considerations and legal and tax matters are also included in a semester project for a concept of the student’s own choosing.

HRM 405 HOSPITALITY SECURITY AND SAFETY (3 credits)

This course examines security, loss prevention, safety, and risk management as related to the hospitality and tourism industries. Legal concepts specific to industry operations are applied in detail through case studies, role-play, and site visits. Students conduct a risk assessment survey and compose a loss prevention management plan.

 

HRM 406 BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT (3 credits)
This course studies the classification, production, identification, and service of beers, wines, and distilled spirits in the hospitality industry. Students learn the historical, legal, and social implications of alcoholic beverages. Other topics covered include beverage purchasing, bar setup, and beverage operation management. Particular attention is given to alcohol’s affects on the body and responsible service.
HRM 407 TOURISM TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS (3 credits)

Analyzes the management of land, sea, and air transportation systems that support travel; examines airlines, cruise ships, buses, rail, and travel packages.

HRM 410 FRONT OFFICE OPERATIONS (3 credits)

This course explores the operation of the front desk of a hotel with a constant consideration for hospitable guest service. Introductions are given to hotel terminology, systems, and techniques for dealing with every aspect of the entire guest visit. Topics covered include departmental structure and management, reservations, check-in and checkout, billing guest requests and issues, and property management systems.

HRM 411 HOUSEKEEPING MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course examines the management of housekeeping in hospitality operations. While primarily designed to cover issues related to hotels, this course is beneficial to anyone in the hospitality industry. Topics will include management of cleaning functions; staffing; sanitation requirements and standards procedure development and supervision, material; equipment and supply administration; and facility, asset, and staff protection.

HRM 410 TRAVEL, LEISURE, AND THE TOURISM INDUSTRY (3 credits)

Introduces the global travel and tourism industry; covers tourist behavior, tourism’s impact on the community, economic implications, marketing, and trends such as eco-tourism or green tourism. Also discusses the travel business as a whole, including travel modes, accommodations, safety and health while traveling, trip planning, trip packagers or wholesalers, and the necessary qualities of a tour director. Employs computer applications and world geography throughout.

HRM 411 TRAVEL AGENCY BASICS (3 credits)

Provides a systematic and comprehensive overview of the travel industry with the focus on travel agencies; covers the pivotal role of the travel agent and the nature of the relationship between agents and supplies and between agents and their client.

HRM 412 MARKETING OF TOURISM DESTINATIONS (3 credits)

This course examines the marketing of hospitality and tourism operations. Students explore destination-oriented marketing goals and strategies, trend issues, and challenges influencing hospitality and tourism destination organizations. Specific topics include fundamental marketing principles as they apply to hospitality and tourism services, customer behavior, advertising, publicity, and public relations.

HRM 413 TOURISM AND SERVING THE INTERNATIONAL VISITOR (3 credits)

Examines the benefits, needs, and expectations of visitors from outside the U.S.A; covers the skills needed to provide services to culturally diverse groups and individuals and the methods utilized for adapting experiences to these persons’ unique needs.

HRM 414 CASINO AND GAMING OPERATIONS (3 credits)

This course analyzes gaming as a discipline and introduces students to gaming as an integral part of the hospitality industry. Students will study gaming development, casino organization and operation, the mathematics of casino games, and the importance and integration of gaming in hospitality management.

HRM 415 HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP (3 credits)

This course provides an opportunity for the student to complete a relevant internship in a specialized area of the hospitality and tourism industry; emphasis is placed on meeting the needs of both the student and the hospitality operation offering the management internship. Students must complete 400 hours of internship work.