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MASTER IN HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT
Total Credits 36
Cost

Total per Credit Hour: $650.00

Application Fee: $100.00 (Nonrefundable)

Graduation Fee: $250.00

Admission Requirements Applicants will be considered for admission if they satisfy the following:

•     Hold an acceptable baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university (Provide copy of sealed transcripts),

•     Have achieved a minimum undergraduate grade point average of at least 3.0 (4.0),

•     Submit a completed Admissions Application,

•     Submit a $100 nonrefundable application fee,

•     Submit an updated Resume,

•     Submit 3 letters of professional references (non family members),

•     Submit a personal statement that describes the applicant’s professional accomplishments and goals.

•     Copy of valid government issued ID

Program Objective The program is devoted to impart theoretical and practical knowledge in Health Care Management. The program aims to prepare students for professional level and managerial position either in Health Care Management or in Hospital Management. The goal is to develop individuals with abilities and practical skills that are essential for a competent and responsible manager.
Program Description Uniquely designed for the busy professional, the courses are planned and updated in accordance with the changing healthcare environment. In addition to preparing you for executive-level positions, you’ll be challenged through an array of academic methodologies, including case studies, lectures, group assignments, and community and healthcare projects. Balancing patient needs with fiscal responsibility makes healthcare an especially complex entity, requiring effective leadership at the helm. It demands leaders who possess focused determination to deliver strong ideas that drive operational results without sacrificing quality of care.
Program Course Descriptions
Course # Course Title and Description
HSA 501 THE AMERICAN HEALTHCARE SYSTEM (3 credits)

Examines the structure, financing and operation of the US healthcare industry. It analyzes how priorities are established, how services are organized and delivered, factors that influence the cost, quality and availability of healthcare, and opposing positions on the future of healthcare reform. This course serves as an introduction for healthcare majors.

HSA 502 STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP OF HEALTHCARE ORGANIZATIONS (3 credits)

Explores how healthcare organizations can create sustainable competitive advantage in a volatile, reimbursement driven industry. Topics include external and internal environmental analysis, strategy formulation, organizational design and control and the impact of mergers and alliances on industry performance. Healthcare case studies are used to illustrate key concepts.

HSA 503 HEALTHCARE INFORMATICS (3 credits)

Examines the unique challenges of clinical and patient care delivery in the healthcare industry, including the role of data management, emerging data standards and information technology in improving the quality and cost associated with healthcare. The focus of the course will be on healthcare IT including issues related to governance, data integration, and selection and management of healthcare IT.

HSA 504 HEALTHCARE NEGOTIATION AND DISPUTE RESOLUTION (3 credits)

This course explores the theories, processes, and practical techniques of negotiation so that students can successfully negotiate and resolve disputes in a variety of situations including interpersonal, group, and international settings. Emphasis is placed on understanding influence and conflict resolution strategies; identifying interests, issues, and positions of the parties involved; analyzing co-negotiators, their negotiation styles, and the negotiation situations; and managing the dynamics associated with most negotiations. Practical skills are developed through the use of simulations and exercises.

HSA 505 HEALTHCARE ECONOMICS (3 credits)

This course applies the tools of economic analysis to the challenges and opportunities faced by managers and policy makers in the health sector. Topics covered include: measuring the benefits of healthcare, the role of insurance in spreading risk and altering incentives, the production of healthcare, price and non-price competition among providers, international comparisons of healthcare systems, and proposed policies that are intended to expand access and contain cost.

HSA 506 ETHICS IN HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course explores ethical issues specific to the healthcare industry including: fraud and abuse, rationing, uninsured treatment, the role of government, and end of life decisions.

HSA 507 NEGOTIATION AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT IN HEALTHCARE (3 credits)

Develops critical negotiating and conflict management skills to significantly improve the quality of life within a medical organization. Topics include recognizing the difference between constructive and disruptive conflict, developing systems that handle conflict at the least disruptive level, mediating disagreements among colleagues, negotiating against a stronger opponent and dealing with disruptive or impaired colleagues.

HSA 508 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT OF HEALTHCARE ORGANIZATION (3 credits)

Develops the strategic thinking skills required to create sustainable competitive advantage in a healthcare organization. Topics include critically assessing a medical organization’s competitive strengths and weaknesses, analyzing competitive threats to long-term survival, strategy formulation and the identification of potential strategic partners.

HSA 509 MOTIVATIONAL LEADERSHIP IN HEALTHCARE ORGANIZATIONS (3 credits)

Analyzes the types of behaviors that lead to high performance within healthcare organizations. Topics include individual behavior and motivation, behavioral job requirements and job/person matching, the differences between leadership and managerial behavior; and how to establish and maintain a high performance work climate.

HSA 510 SERVICE QUALITY IMPROVEMENT AND PATIENT SATISFACTION (3 credits)

Provides the tools physicians need to grow their practices by improving the quality of their patient service processes. Topics include how to identify and improve key service processes, redesigning critical service processes to improve operating efficiency, and developing products and services that add patient value.

HSA 511 HEALTHCARE LAW, POLICY, AND REGULATION (3 credits)

This course examines how healthcare laws and regulations are enacted, and their impact on providers, payers, and patients. Topics include: Stark prohibitions on provider self-referral, federal regulation of fraud and abuse, the Emergency Treatment and Active Labor Act (EMTALA), and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA). It also examines the process by which Congressional legislation is transformed into day-to-day industry regulation.

HSA 512 HEALTHCARE INTERNSHIP (3 credits)

Student gains experience and improves skills through appropriate developmental work assignments in a real business environment. Student must identify and submit specific business learning objectives at the beginning of the semester. The student must demonstrate exposure to the managerial perspective via involvement or observation. At semester end, student prepares an oral or poster presentation, or a written paper reflecting on the work experience.

 

MASTER   IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Total Credits 42
Cost

Total per Credit Hour: $650.00

Application Fee: $100.00 (Nonrefundable)

Graduation Fee:   $250.00

Admission Requirements

Applicants will be considered for admission if they satisfy the following:

•     Hold an acceptable baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university (Provide copy of sealed transcripts),

•     Have achieved a minimum undergraduate grade point average of at least 3.0 (4.0),

•     Submit a completed Admissions Application,

•     Submit a $100 nonrefundable application fee,

•     Submit an updated Resume,

•     Submit 3 letters of professional references (non family members),

•     Submit a personal statement that describes the applicant’s professional accomplishments and goals.

•     Copy of valid government issued ID

Program Objective The objective of the MBA is to enhance your understanding of today’s global business environment and help you develop the necessary skills to solve real-world business problems. In our program, you will gain advanced education in the processes that make businesses work, including accounting, management, operations, marketing, finance and economics. You will develop the people skills that are critical for effective management as you explore classic and contemporary industry and theory and immerse yourself in the best practices of companies that make up our diverse corporate landscape.
Program Description Throughout our MBA program, you will develop the skills and knowledge to effectively manage an organization with the ability to plan and manage projects, organizational change, and organizational growth.
Program Course Descriptions
Course # Course Title and Description
MBA 500 COMPREHENSIVE STRATEGIC KNOWLEDGE STUDIES (3 credits)

Students will describe, discuss, and apply knowledge in 12 business topical areas necessary to address a wide variety of business-related situations. The course focuses on demonstrating core proficiencies in the following business areas: Marketing, Business Finance, Accounting, Management, Legal Environment of Business, Economics, Business Ethics, Global Dimensions of Business, Information Systems, Quantitative Techniques and Statistics, Leadership, and Business Applications. The intent of this course is not to introduce these core business concepts, but rather to verify a bachelor-degree-level threshold competency within each topical business core area. The course includes a comprehensive case study that will allow the students to demonstrate their competency with all 12 common professional components.

MBA 501 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (3 credits)

Appreciation and understanding of the field of organizational behavior and its application in managing human and other resources. Emphasizes understanding individual behavior (motivation, self-awareness, leadership, etc.) and group dynamics (decision-making, group development and work) plus conflict, climate, learning styles, power, stress, process/content, human rights and quality. Utilizes experiential learning methodologies and other appropriate designs.

MBA 502 ETHICS IN BUSINESS (3 credits)

This course will emphasize the individual as decision-maker and focus upon ethical issues and dilemmas facing managers in most business organizations.  The specific objectives of the course are to raise students’ general awareness of ethical dilemmas at work, to place ethical issues within a management context subject to analysis and decision-making action, and to enhance and improve the ability of students to reason toward a satisfactory resolution of an ethical dilemma.

MBA 503 BUSINESS STATISTICS (3 credits)

This course provides the fundamental methods of statistical analysis, the art and science if extracting information from data. The course will begin with a focus on the basic elements of exploratory data analysis, probability theory and statistic inference. With this as a foundation, it will proceed to explore the use of the key statistical methodology known as regression analysis for solving business problems, such as the prediction of future sales and the response of the market to price changes. The use of regression diagnostics and various graphical displays supplement the basic numerical summaries and provides insight into the validity of the models. Specific important topics covered include least squares estimation, residuals and outliers, tests and confidence intervals, correlation and autocorrelation, and randomization. The presentation relies upon computer software for most of the needed calculations, and the resulting style focuses on construction of models, interpretation of results, and critical evaluation of assumptions.

MBA 504 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course is designed to acquaint students with best practices for leveraging the competitive value of human capital in organizations. Students will be exposed to current issues and practices associated with workforce management, including the legal and regulatory elements of managing employees, staffing, job analysis, performance management, discipline, compensation systems, benefits and termination. A strategic approach will be emphasized which encompasses methods of measuring the financial implications of human resource practices and exposure to a balanced scorecard approach to human resources management.

MBA 505 MARKETING MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

Develops market-based knowledge and skills for effective marketing decision-making, strategy design, implementation, and evaluation in wide variety of institutional and competitive situations. Addresses the importance of companies being market-driven and customer-focused. Emphasis on case studies, teamwork, and projects.

MBA 506 CORPORATE FINANCE (3 credits)

Corporate Financial Management (CFM) is an advanced corporate finance course. The course’s goal is to build the analytical and practical tools essential for value-based management. The course is designed for all students who want to develop the skills necessary to evaluate a corporation’s major strategic and investment decisions from a financial perspective. Hence it is ideal for students who intend to pursue a career in finance – such as in the finance area of a corporation, or servicing corporate clients in a financial institution, or in private equity or as an analyst or portfolio manager – and for students who want to launch a senior general management career from a finance specialization. But the course also serves students who simply want to develop a broader view of the financial landscape and obtain a deeper understanding of major corporate financial decisions – such as the decision to undertake a leveraged buyout, or to buy back large quantities of shares from the market.

MBA 507 BUSINESS LAW (3 credits)

This course focuses on the theory and application of business regulations and the laws of contracts, agency, and property and business organizations.

MBA 508 BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

Examination of organizational theory and managerial concepts of human behavior in organizations. Topics include theoretical and practical application of motivation, leadership, power, and reward systems. Provides a balanced view of the structural and human sides of organization design.

MBA 509 LEADERSHIP AND ETHICS (3 credits)

The reality of business life is that no person is an island—smart quantitative analysis without the support of employees, colleagues, or supervisors goes nowhere. To succeed in your career and to improve the performance of your company requires working with others effectively.  The goal is to prepare you to be an effective leader and manager of others regardless of your career path and to be a good analyst of how best to organize people.

MBA 510 NEW VENTURE FORMATION (3 credits)

In this course for would-be or practicing entrepreneurs, you will learn about the characteristics of entrepreneurs, how entrepreneurial activities are formed, how to acquire know-how by developing entrepreneurial and managerial competencies and skills, and how to apply the entrepreneurial model of vision for developing your own business.

MBA 511 VENTURE CAPITAL AND PRIVATE EQUITY (3 credits)

Through lectures, group discussions, case studies, and a hands-on exercise, you will develop a new perspective on the multifaceted issues that investors face over the course of numerous market cycles. Engaging in robust debates and practical exercises will strengthen your problem-solving and decision-making skills. As a result, you will return to your company better prepared to formulate an effective investment strategy, raise needed capital, and facilitate productive negotiations.

MBA 512 SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS PRACTICES (3 credits)

Progressive companies recognize that sustainability is both a principle of smart management and innovation’s newest frontier. Businesses are already being transformed by the quest for sustainability, driving companies to change the way they think about products, technologies, processes, and business models. Successful managers need to be able to identify economic, social and environmental opportunities and issues and develop innovative strategies to leverage them for competitive advantage.

Students will examine why and how businesses are addressing environmental and sustainability issues across sectors and industries. You will gain the skills and tools you need to identify the issues and opportunities most pertinent to your business, set appropriate goals, develop and integrate new strategies, and then measure performance.

MBA 513 CAPSTONE PROJECT (3 credits)

The Capstone Project provides a final stage of the learning process. It requires mastery of the course work stage and extends this to a higher level of personal investigation, and a greater degree of specialization. The combination of setting the problem by choosing the topic, deciding on the issues to be considered, and the difficulties of structuring both the research process and the final report make this the most challenging element of the program and one which calls on intellectual skills appropriate to many aspects of senior management. Critical argument and the design of solutions involving multiple considerations are requirements for successful completion of the program.

MASTER   IN HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM
Total Credits 36
Cost

Total per Credit Hour: $650.00

Application Fee: $100.00 (Nonrefundable)

Graduation Fee:     $250.00

Admission Requirements

Applicants will be considered for admission if they satisfy the following

:•     Hold an acceptable baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university (Provide copy of sealed transcripts),

•     Have achieved a minimum undergraduate grade point average of at least 3.0 (4.0),

•     Submit a completed Admissions Application,

•     Submit a $100 nonrefundable application fee,

•     Submit an updated Resume,

•     Submit 3 letters of professional references (non family members)

•     Submit a personal statement that describes the applicant’s professional accomplishments and goals.

•     Copy of valid government issued ID

Program Objective The objective of the Master in Hospitality and Tourism is to provide students with knowledge and tools in the industry. To program will prepare students with strategic and operational insights of the hospitality and the tourism world.   The program will train students to perform and manage in a global environment.
Program Description The Masters in Hospitality and Tourism is a professional program designed to prepare students for advanced careers in the global hospitality and tourism industry. Students best suited for the program are career-directed individuals with previous management experience who have a global perspective. Graduates of these programs often seek mid to upper level management. The program provides a comprehensive study of the many facets of international hospitality and tourism management. Students receive thorough training in the major functional areas of multinational organizations. The program provides a broad knowledge base focused on practice that can be applied in many different areas. Tourism, due to its global character, is constantly evolving and as a result the master’s program emphasizes strategy, innovation and consumer relations.
Program Course Descriptions
Course # Course Title and Description
HFT 501

INTERNATIONAL SERVICE MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

Overview of the contemporary issues in the international business environment facing multinational service firms in the hospitality industry. These issues include such topics as global strategy formulation and implementation, technology challenges, diversity in customers and employees, political and legal concerns, and effective organizational structures for long-term survival.

HFT 502 CHAIN MANAGEMENT IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRIES (3 credits)

The organization, administration and evaluation of existing and challenging practices, concepts and theories in chain management in the hospitality industries.

HFT 503 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course focuses upon the attainment of employees within the hospitality industry. Topics include the processes, practices and legal considerations involved in the employment of people in hospitality organizations.

HFT 504

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT IN THE HOSPITALITY SERVICE INDUSTRIES (3 credits)

Fundamentals of financial management as applied to hotels, restaurants, institutions and similar service organizations.

HFT 505 HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM MARKETING STRATEGY AND POLICY (3 credits)

Examination of the role of marketing within the strategic planning of hospitality service organizations.

HFT 506 FRANCHISING IN HOSPITALITY (3 credits)

Role of franchising in hospitality management. Contemporary issues related to franchising in different segments of the hospitality industry, including franchise concept development, franchisor-franchisee relationship, franchise agreements, operational problems, and international franchising.

HFT 507 CONTEMPORARY PROBLEMS IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY (3 credits)

Consideration and analysis of relevant industry problems and issues facing management and personnel in the hospitality industries. Computer literacy required.

HFT 508 EVENTS MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

Management of special events in the hospitality and tourism industry. Students will explore organizational functions necessary for producing special events, as well as analyzing the factors that influence an event’s success, such as organizational structure, risk management and the impact of tourism activity.

HFT 509 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT & COMPETITIVE STRATEGY IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRIES (3 credits)

To enable students to develop a comprehensive understanding of the concepts of strategic management and competitive strategy as applied to the hospitality industries.

HFT 510 HOSPITALITY MARKETING RESEARCH PROBLEMS (3 credits)

Research designs and methodologies for the solution of hospitality industry marketing problems. Analysis and interpretation of marketing research studies.

HFT 511 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide an in-depth exploration of the literature and research that has been developing in the context of the hospitality and tourism industry, specifically as it applies to the hotel, restaurant and tourism sectors. Specific methodological approaches encountered in an industry-specific environment will be identified and evaluated. The current state of theory development will be assessed and key issues relevant to further theory building will be explored. The course will be in a seminar format where students will be expected to develop a comprehensive and in-depth understanding of the body of knowledge relative to strategy in the hospitality and tourism industry.

HFT 512 CAPSTONE (3 credits)

Presentation and critical discussion of current literature and major topics in hospitality and tourism management. The seminar provides a forum for the discussion of research and research problems in hospitality and tourism management and the presentation of research by graduate students.

 

BS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Total Credits 120
Cost

Total per Credit Hour: $500.00

Application Fee: $100.00 (Nonrefundable)

Graduation Fee:   $250.00

Admission Requirements

•     Submit a High School Diploma or a GED

•     Submit a completed Admissions Application,

•     Submit a $100 nonrefundable application fee,

•     Submit an updated Resume,

•     Submit a personal statement that describes the applicant’s professional accomplishments and goals.

•     Copy of valid government issued ID

Program Objective The objective of the BS in Business Administration is to provide students with a solid a career-oriented business education. The emphasis is on personal and professional integrity, as well as social responsibility. The student will develop competencies in written and oral communications, quantitative analysis, critical and creative thinking, and development of management skills.
Program Description The students who graduate with a BS in Business Administration degree will be equipped with a knowledge of business theories, policies, and procedures and will be prepared to assume a   position within the world of business. The program refines a student’s commitment to personal values and moral excellence as well as professional competence. Graduates will have acquired skills in decision-making, problem solving, and leadership, in addition to fundamental business and management procedures
Program Course Descriptions
Course # Course Title and Description** Denotes General Education Course
ACG 001 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING (3 credits)

This course introduces accounting concepts in a business environment. Students learn to create and apply accounting documents in making better business decisions. Other topics include plant assets, liabilities, accounting for corporations, investments, statements of cash flows, financial statement analysis, time value of money, payroll accounting, and other significant liabilities.

ACG 002 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (3 credits)

Integrates the accounting process with the planning, coordinating, and control functions of the business organization. Topics include strategic planning, tactical and operational decision-making, budgeting, responsibility accounting, and performance measurement. PREREQUISITE ACG 001

ACG 451 ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide accounting students with the proper mix of technical information and real-world applications. Areas of study include fundamental concepts and technologies (what computers can do for business), the Internet, intranets, electronic commerce, information systems development, basic project management principles, decision support systems, and the benefits of computer and human synergy.

ARH 250 ART HISTORY * (3 credits)

The course provides students with a general foundation in sequential and thematic knowledge of the great moments in Art, Architecture, and Culture throughout history, from the earliest times to the present.

BUL 370 BUSINESS LAW (3 credits)

This course reviews the U.S. legal system, common law and its development, organizational structures, and the regulatory environment pertinent to business. Students will learn to critically examine torts, crimes, and business ethics. They will also examine contracts; business associations including agencies, partnerships, and corporations; wills, estates, trusts, and other legal entities; securities regulations; and investor protections.

CAP 330 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER APPLICATIONS AND SYSTEMS  (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of Business Information Systems. Students learn to apply Microsoft® Office tools including word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation software to accomplish business objectives. Other topics include uses of application software and the Internet for effective problem solving, exploration of relevant emerging technologies, and how information is used across different industries.

ECO 360 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (3 credits)

This course provides students with the basic theories, concepts, terminology, and uses of microeconomics. Students learn practical applications for microeconomics in their personal and professional lives through assimilation of fundamental concepts and analysis of actual economic events.

ECO 380 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (3 credits)

This course provides students with the basic theories, concepts, terminology, and uses of macroeconomics. Students learn practical applications for macroeconomics in their personal and professional lives through assimilation of fundamental concepts and analysis of actual economic events.

ECO 424 COST ANALYSIS (3 credits)

This course teaches students the fundamental elements and tools for measuring the effect of inflation on a company’s financial statements, a phenomenon that currently affects the entire economy and, as such, should be understood, studied and analyzed by an administrator or public accountant in order to make logical decisions in the business environment.

ENC 120 COLLEGE COMPOSITION I * (3 credits)

ENC 120 is a college-level writing course that introduces students to various forms of academic discourse. Students are required to prepare essays in a variety of rhetorical modes, including exposition, description and argumentation. In addition to out-of-class writing assignments, students will be required to compose in-class essays in response to readings and other prompts. ENC 120 introduces students to process-writing techniques, library research and APA documentation procedures. The primary focus of ENC 120 is to help students acquire the writing skills they need to succeed in an academic environment.

ENC 121 COLLEGE COMPOSITION II * (3 credits)

ENC 121 is the sequel to ENC 120. This course concentrates on argumentative writing and requires students to prepare a major research report, one that reveals fluency with argumentative strategies and rhetorical conventions. In addition, students are introduced to analytical reading techniques, critical research methods and current documentation procedures. Although other kinds of writing are commonly assigned in ENC 121, argumentation remains the major focus of study.
Prerequisite(s): ENC 120

ENV 101 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE * (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to the scientific aspects of the environmental field. The first part of the course introduces students to the foundations of environmental science, while the second part concentrates on the application of these foundations to real life environmental problems. Therefore, the course not only engages the fundamentals of environmental science but also shows students how science informs sustainability, environmental policies, economics and personal choice.

ETH 340 ETHICS AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY  (3 credits)

This course provides a foundational perspective for ethics and social responsibility in relationship to individuals, organizations, and the community. Emphasis is placed on the inter-related nature of ethics, morality, legal responsibility, and social issues

FIN 215 CORPORATION FINANCE (3 credits)

Applies financial management to organizations. Topics include ratio analysis, leverage, cash budgeting, and capital structure.

FIN 390 FINANCE FOR BUSINESS (3 credits)

This course introduces the student to the essential elements of finance for business. Emphasis is placed on financial management, financial markets, and the tools, techniques, and methodologies used in making financial decisions. Topics include: Financial planning, working capital management, capital budgeting, long term financing, and international finance.

GEO 200 WORLD GEOGRAPHY * (3 credits)

This course examines the implications of global location and topography for the people of planet Earth. Students will explore how geography shapes the dynamics of human societies, with an emphasis on the geo environmental, geopolitical, and geo social phenomena that help to define the modern world.

ISM 310 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3 credits)

Discusses the use of computers in business, as well as database management and information system fundamentals.

MAC 105 COLLEGE MATHEMATICS I * (3 credits)

This course provides a general introduction to college mathematics. Students learn the following mathematical concepts in a logical sequence that increases in difficulty as students gain command of a concept: polynomials, equations, inequalities, the straight line, Cartesian coordinates, functions and graphs, systems of linear equations, logarithms and exponentials, matrix algebra, limit of a function, and derivate of a function and integral.

MAC 114 COLLEGE MATHEMATICS I * (3 credits)

This course provides students with the methodologies required to understand the role played by the inductive method in this field of Mathematics. Trigonometric functions, identities and conditional equations, solution of triangles, trigonometric forms of complex numbers are all taught.

MAN 301 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (3 credits)

Surveys the legal and cultural environment of international business; the international financial system; management of international operations; personnel and labor relations; international marketing; international economics, trade, and finance; multinational enterprise; and international accounting.

MAN 310 QUALITY MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

The pressures of change, resulting from the market, technology, competition and capital markets appear to affect all businesses with accumulative impact. A small part of the pressure that comes from each of the many factors of change could result in a significant total affect. When the pressures consistently come from the same direction, they produce a permanent change in the way business is done. This course provides ample coverage of the Quality Management required in order to use change as a challenge and as an asset to improve business competitiveness.

MAN 312 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (3 credits)

The class material will include both theory and practical application of Organizational Behavior in organizations. OB is the study of how individuals and groups impact the behavior within an organization. It is a field of systematic study that focuses on improving productivity, quality, and assisting practitioners to develop methods to empower people as well as to design and implement to change programs. We live in a world characterized by rapid change, globalization, and diversity. OB offers insights in these areas while providing guidance for managers in creating an ethically healthy work climate.

MAN 315 BUSINESS ETHICS (3 credits)

Examines the nature of morality and theories of normative ethics. Identifies a variety of ethical issues and moral challenges involving consumers, the environment, the professions, and the role of the corporation in our society.

MAN 317 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

Provides an overview of management history and theory, schools of management thought, the functions and processes of management, and the environment within which the modern manager operates.

MAN 319 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course approaches Operations Management from the inside out. It develops the student’s personal understanding of processes, process capabilities and results and then transfers those into the business environment. The course builds on an understanding of applied statistics to develop an understanding of the planning and the processes involved in the creation of value both through provision of services and manufacture of goods. Topics include process flow and capability, operations strategy, total quality management (TQM), supply chain and capacity management, process improvement, project management.

MAN 330 ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (3 credits)

This organizational behavior course encompasses the study of individual and group behavior in organizational settings. Students will learn to examine their role in an organization. Other topics include strategic elements of organizational behavior, workforce diversity, managing change, effective communication, and performance systems.

MAN 350 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course is geared towards two fundamental aspects: a. the introduction of students to the ideas, theories, concepts and approaches of this area of management; and b. the demonstration and guidance of students in the application and implementation of programs and studies in human resources management.

MAN 410 INTEGRATED BUSINESS TOPICS (3 credits)

The integrated business topics course examines strategic business management while integrating topics from previously completed business foundation coursework. This allows students to demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the undergraduate business curricula with a significant emphasis placed on the assessment of individual outcomes to determine content mastery.

MAN 415 ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION (3 credits)

This course helps students identify the different supervisory techniques and phases of the administrative process. Students learn the importance of leadership in the personnel supervision process. In addition, students learn about group dynamic processes and their usefulness in managing the personnel of an organization. PREREQUISITE: MAN 35O

MAN 419 PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course examines project management roles and environments, the project life cycle, and various techniques of work planning, control, and evaluation for project success.

MAN 420 GLOBAL BUSINESS STRATEGIES (3 credits)

The manager’s perspective in the fields of international payments, international trade, and investment are analyzed. Emphasis is given to the materials and concepts that illuminate the strategies, structure, practices, and effects of multinational enterprises.

MAN 450 CAPSTONE (3 credits)

The course provides students with the opportunity to integrate and apply learning from their professional programs of study in a comprehensive manner. Students will also assess the impact of their educational experiences on their ethical perspectives and critical thinking skills. Students will reflect on and evaluate their personal and professional growth, the benefits of lifelong learning, and the impact of these elements on their future.

MAR 400 MARKETING (3 credits)

This course involves an integrated analysis of the role of marketing within the total organization. Specific attention is given to the analysis of factors affecting consumer behavior, the identification of marketing variables, the development and use of marketing strategies, and the discussion of international marketing issues.

PHI 210 CRITICAL THINKING *  (3 credits)

This course helps students develop strategies for “learning to think” and “thinking for learning”, using a variety of methods and resources to question their thoughts and their ways of expression, the intention behind what they say, its meaning, and its relationship to their beliefs. Students develop an ideological framework for assessing whether they have a solid and legitimate foundation for such thoughts and expressions.

PSY 201 INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY * (3 credits)

This course places an emphasis on behavior and the factors that influence it, as well as on describing the cognitive, affective and personality factors that make up behavior. The knowledge acquired by the students in this course will provide them with a holistic view of man and serve as the basis for understanding other courses related to behavioral science.

QMB 400 QUANTITATIVE BUSINESS RESEARCH (3 credits)

This course integrates applied business research and descriptive statistics. Students will learn to apply business research and descriptive statistics in making better business decisions. Other topics include examination of the role of statistics in research, statistical terminology, the appropriate use of statistical techniques, and interpretation of statistical findings in business and research.

SLS 100 STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS SEMINAR (3 credits)

SFS100 is designed to assist students with learning skills that are essential for academic success in college. Students will be taught a variety of learning skills and strategies that will enable them to experience success in college classes and beyond. By applying principles taught throughout the semester, students will become independent learners and will maximize their educational experience.

SOC 201 INTRO TO SOCIOLOGY * (3 credits)

Students should understand their role in society and be capable of interpreting the social phenomena surrounding them. This course provides students with a basic understanding of how the society functions, and specifically how groups work.

SPC 260 ORAL COMMUNICATIONS * (3 credits)

This course helps a student develop his or her abilities and skills in expression and the spoken language. Students apply the techniques of oral exposition and learn to distinguish between the different techniques used in organized oral discussions. PREREQUISITE: ENC 121

MAT 240/STA 240 APPLIED STATISTICS * (3 credits)

This is a fundamental course in the application of statistics. In this course, students will learn to apply statistical techniques to a variety of applications in business and the social sciences. Students will learn how to solve statistical problems by hand and through the use of computer software. Topics include probability distribution functions, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing and linear regression.

BS IN HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM
Total Credits 120
Cost

Total per Credit Hour: $500.00

Application Fee: $100.00 (Nonrefundable)

Graduation Fee: $250.00

Admission Requirements

·         Submit a High School Diploma or a GED

·         Submit a completed Admissions Application,

·         Submit a $100 nonrefundable application fee,

·         Submit an updated Resume,

·         Submit a personal statement that describes the applicant’s professional accomplishments and goals.

·         Copy of valid government issued ID

Program Objective The objective of the program is to assess, develop and apply requisite competencies of Hospitality and Tourism Management, to include accounting and finance, cost controls, event planning and management, restaurant operations, sanitation and safety practices, travel and tourism planning and management/leadership and hospitality law. The student will analyze, evaluate and solve managerial problems that utilize quantitative reasoning concepts, critical thinking in all sectors of the hospitality industry in a global, cultural and diverse society. The student will also evaluate leadership and ethical decision-making competencies based on standards set by the industry.
Program Description The BS in Hospitality and Tourism Management is designed to prepare students for management careers within the hospitality and tourism industry. The student will develop a solid knowledge of hospitality and tourism business operations and effective leadership and management skills. The student will be equipped with the skills, knowledge, and experience required for success in the hospitality and tourism industry. The student will increase their skills in analysis and problem solving and will be ready to apply their learning in today’s global business environment.
Program Course Descriptions
Course # Course Title and Description* Denotes General Education Course
SFS 100 STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS SEMINAR (3 credits)

SFS100 is designed to assist students with learning skills that are essential for academic success in college. Students will be taught a variety of learning skills and strategies that will enable them to experience success in college classes and beyond. By applying principles taught throughout the semester, students will become independent learners and will maximize their educational experience.

ENC 120 COLLEGE COMPOSITION I * (3 credits)

ENC 120 is a college-level writing course that introduces students to various forms of academic discourse. Students are required to prepare essays in a variety of rhetorical modes, including exposition, description and argumentation. In addition to out-of-class writing assignments, students will be required to compose in-class essays in response to readings and other prompts. ENC 120 introduces students to process-writing techniques, library research and APA documentation procedures. The primary focus of ENC 120 is to help students acquire the writing skills they need to succeed in an academic environment.

ENC 121 COLLEGE COMPOSITION II * (3 credits)

ENC 121 is the sequel to ENC 120. This course concentrates on argumentative writing and requires students to prepare a major research report, one that reveals fluency with argumentative strategies and rhetorical conventions. In addition, students are introduced to analytical reading techniques, critical research methods and current documentation procedures. Although other kinds of writing are commonly assigned in ENC 121, argumentation remains the major focus of study.
Prerequisite(s): ENC 120

SPC 260 ORAL COMMUNICATIONS * (3 credits)

This course helps a student develop his or her abilities and skills in expression and the spoken language. Students apply the techniques of oral exposition and learn to distinguish between the different techniques used in organized oral discussions.

PREREQUISITE: ENC 120

MAC 105 COLLEGE MATHEMATICS I * (3 credits)

This course provides a general introduction to college mathematics. Students learn the following mathematical concepts in a logical sequence that increases in difficulty as students gain command of a concept: polynomials, equations, inequalities, the straight line, Cartesian coordinates, functions and graphs, systems of linear equations, logarithms and exponentials, matrix algebra, limit of a function, and derivate of a function and integral.

MAC 114 COLLEGE MATHEMATICS II * (3 credits)

This course provides students with the methodologies required to understand the role played by the inductive method in this field of Mathematics. Trigonometric functions, identities and conditional equations, solution of triangles, trigonometric forms of complex numbers are all taught.

MAT 240/STA 240 APPLIED STATISTICS * (3 credits)

This is a fundamental course in the application of statistics. In this course, students will learn to apply statistical techniques to a variety of applications in business and the social sciences. Students will learn how to solve statistical problems by hand and through the use of computer software. Topics include probability distribution functions, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing and linear regression.

PHI 210 CRITICAL THINKING * (3 credits)

This course helps students develop strategies for “learning to think” and “thinking for learning”, using a variety of methods and resources to question their thoughts and their ways of expression, the intention behind what they say, its meaning, and its relationship to their beliefs. Students develop an ideological framework for assessing whether they have a solid and legitimate foundation for such thoughts and expressions.

PSY 201 INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY * (3 credits)

This course places an emphasis on behavior and the factors that influence it, as well as on describing the cognitive, affective and personality factors that make up behavior. The knowledge acquired by the students in this course will provide them with a holistic view of man and serve as the basis for understanding other courses related to behavioral science.

SOC 201 INTRO TO SOCIOLOGY * (3 credits)

Students should understand their role in society and be capable of interpreting the social phenomena surrounding them. This course provides students with a basic understanding of how the society functions, and specifically how groups work.

GEO 200 WORLD GEOGRAPHY * (3 credits)

This course examines the implications of global location and topography for the people of planet Earth. Students will explore how geography shapes the dynamics of human societies, with an emphasis on the geo environmental, geopolitical, and geo social phenomena that help to define the modern world.

ARH 250 ART HISTORY * (3 credits)

The course provides students with a general foundation in sequential and thematic knowledge of the great moments in Art, Architecture, and Culture throughout history, from the earliest times to the present.

ENV 101 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE ** (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to the scientific aspects of the environmental field. The first part of the course introduces students to the foundations of environmental science, while the second part concentrates on the application of these foundations to real life environmental problems. Therefore, the course not only engages the fundamentals of environmental science but also shows students how science informs sustainability, environmental policies, economics and personal choice.

HRM 301 INTRODUCTION TO HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course welcomes students into the exciting and diverse hospitality and tourism industry. While providing an understanding of the scope and complexity of the industry, the course covers key hospitality issues, management definitions, and career opportunities available in restaurants, hotels, beverages operations, casinos, theme venues, entertainment centers, cruise lines, and countless other hospitality and tourism business.

HRM 302 SANITATION AND SAFETY (3 credits)

Covers the principles and practices of sanitation and hygiene as applied to the food service industry, emphasizing the training of supervisory personnel in sanitation procedures.

HRM 303 DINING ROOM MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course examines the detailed operation of a restaurant dining room. Topics include types of table service, dining room organization and table settings, staffing, responsibilities of dining room personnel, customer sales and service, and the design and usage of menus.

HRM 313 TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY (3 credits)

Introduces the basic and specific use of computers in the hospitality industry; provides hands-on use and knowledge of software and information systems used in the various hospitality industry operations.

HRM 304 ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM (3 credits)

This course explores the many exciting opportunities available for individuals interested in opening a restaurant, bar, hotel, or other hospitality and tourism business. Topics include entrepreneurial characteristics, assessing the viability of small hospitality and tourism business ventures, risks, the business planning process, feasibility studies, formation of business plans, the management of small enterprises, record keeping, and personnel management.

HRM 305 PRINCIPLES OF HOSPITALITY FRANCHISE MANAGEME (3 credits)

This course examines franchising in the hospitality industry from both the franchiser and franchisee’s point of view. Students examine start-up, organization, franchiser/franchisee relations, cooperative marketing, legal issues, and daily operations, with an orientation toward the small business franchisee in a variety of hospitality and tourism businesses.

HRM 306 TOURISM PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT (3 credits)

This course teaches students how to identify, develop, and promote tourism and hospitality products and services. Issues such as marketing, sales, advertising, and promotion for the tourism and hospitality industry will be explored, along with basic planning and financial topics. Case studies will be used to illustrate both areas of opportunity and challenges to product development.

HRM 307 SUSTAINABILITY IN TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY (3 credits)

This course provides students with a general overview of issues related to the sustainable planning and management of tourism and hospitality businesses. Concepts such as planning, conservation of resources, monitoring and assessment, environmental audits, visitor management, and green building construction and retrofits will be discussed. The course also provides a larger global and regional perspective on sustainability issues related to tourism, such as the impact of travel on global climate change.

HRM 308 GLOBAL ISSUES IN TRAVEL & TOURISM (3 credits)

As one of the world’s largest industries, and one that brings travelers and host communities into close contact, tourism and travel are rife with challenges. This course delves into these issues from a social science perspective, showing how tourism affects travelers and communities in complex and contentious ways, from commoditization of art forms to sex tourism, drug use, and changes in local economies and culture. It also explores the connection of tourism to global issues such as infectious diseases, climate change, and terrorism.

HRM 309 SUSTAINABLE HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This class focuses on the practical applications of sustainability principles and techniques to the planning and management of tourism and hospitality businesses. Taught by faculty experienced in designing and implementing sustainable hospitality guidelines, it will take students through the steps of assessing planned or existing businesses and making or recommending steps to make these businesses more environmentally sustainable. State, national, and international guidelines for sustainable businesses will be examined.

HUM 350 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course is geared towards two fundamental aspects: a. the introduction of students to the ideas, theories, concepts and approaches of this area of management; and b. the demonstration and guidance of students in the application and implementation of programs and studies in human resources management.

HRM 400 LEGAL ISSUES IN HOSPITALTIY AND TOURISM (3 credits)

This course examines the common and statutory law of the hospitality and tourism industry in the United States. Included are discussions of the duties and responsibilities of hospitality and tourism businesses to guests, including duties to maintain property, receive travelers and assume various liabilities for guests’ property. The legal environment and issues of the hotel, restaurant and travel industry will be discussed and analyzed. Ways of preventing and responding to legal situations as an executive in the hospitality and tourism industry will be identified and evaluated.

HRM 401 TRENDS AND INNOVATION IN TOURISM & HOSPITALITY (3 credits)

Students will be introduced to major trends and innovations in contemporary tourism and hospitality, with a focus on identifying opportunities in the industry. In addition to studying global and national trends in travel, the course will look at specific innovations that create new prospects for tourism in the region or demand for new types of products such as green tourism.

HRM 402 HOSPITALITY NEGOTIATION AND SALES (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of the legal, ethical, and practical environment that impacts the negotiation of meeting contracts and the execution of the events that they represent. It examines the strategies of negotiation and sales.

HRM 403 HOSPITALITY FOR PROFIT (3 credits)

This course concentrates on the analysis and interpretation of the hospitality and tourism industry accounting procedures and financial statements. Balance sheets, income statements, and cash flow statements will be covered. Principles of budgeting, forecasting, pricing techniques, financial ratios and financial management case problems explicit to the hotel, restaurant, tourism, and meeting industries are studied.

HRM 404 HOSPITALITY STRATEGY AND BUSINESS PLAN (3 credits)

This course provides the student with the major elements of a successful concept package and business plan for a proposed hospitality operation. Criteria for site selection, market analysis, location factors, and menu consistent with concept are covered. Forecasting, budgeting, and controlling sales and costs, financing considerations and legal and tax matters are also included in a semester project for a concept of the student’s own choosing.

HRM 405 HOSPITALITY SECURITY AND SAFETY (3 credits)

This course examines security, loss prevention, safety, and risk management as related to the hospitality and tourism industries. Legal concepts specific to industry operations are applied in detail through case studies, role-play, and site visits. Students conduct a risk assessment survey and compose a loss prevention management plan.

HRM 406 BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course studies the classification, production, identification, and service of beers, wines, and distilled spirits in the hospitality industry. Students learn the historical, legal, and social implications of alcoholic beverages. Other topics covered include beverage purchasing, bar setup, and beverage operation management. Particular attention is given to alcohol’s affects on the body and responsible service.

HRM 407 TOURISM TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS (3 credits)

Analyzes the management of land, sea, and air transportation systems that support travel; examines airlines, cruise ships, buses, rail, and travel packages.

HRM 410 FRONT OFFICE OPERATIONS (3 credits)

This course explores the operation of the front desk of a hotel with a constant consideration for hospitable guest service. Introductions are given to hotel terminology, systems, and techniques for dealing with every aspect of the entire guest visit. Topics covered include departmental structure and management, reservations, check-in and checkout, billing guest requests and issues, and property management systems.

HRM 411 HOUSEKEEPING MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course examines the management of housekeeping in hospitality operations. While primarily designed to cover issues related to hotels, this course is beneficial to anyone in the hospitality industry. Topics will include management of cleaning functions; staffing; sanitation requirements and standards procedure development and supervision, material; equipment and supply administration; and facility, asset, and staff protection.

HRM 410 TRAVEL, LEISURE, AND THE TOURISM INDUSTRY (3 credits)

Introduces the global travel and tourism industry; covers tourist behavior, tourism’s impact on the community, economic implications, marketing, and trends such as eco-tourism or green tourism. Also discusses the travel business as a whole, including travel modes, accommodations, safety and health while traveling, trip planning, trip packagers or wholesalers, and the necessary qualities of a tour director. Employs computer applications and world geography throughout.

HRM 411 TRAVEL AGENCY BASICS (3 credits)

Provides a systematic and comprehensive overview of the travel industry with the focus on travel agencies; covers the pivotal role of the travel agent and the nature of the relationship between agents and supplies and between agents and their client.

HRM 412 MARKETING OF TOURISM DESTINATIONS (3 credits)

This course examines the marketing of hospitality and tourism operations. Students explore destination-oriented marketing goals and strategies, trend issues, and challenges influencing hospitality and tourism destination organizations. Specific topics include fundamental marketing principles as they apply to hospitality and tourism services, customer behavior, advertising, publicity, and public relations.

HRM 413 TOURISM AND SERVING THE INTERNATIONAL VISITOR (3 credits)

Examines the benefits, needs, and expectations of visitors from outside the U.S.A; covers the skills needed to provide services to culturally diverse groups and individuals and the methods utilized for adapting experiences to these persons’ unique needs.

HRM 414 CASINO AND GAMING OPERATIONS (3 credits)

This course analyzes gaming as a discipline and introduces students to gaming as an integral part of the hospitality industry. Students will study gaming development, casino organization and operation, the mathematics of casino games, and the importance and integration of gaming in hospitality management.

HRM 415 HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP (3 credits)

This course provides an opportunity for the student to complete a relevant internship in a specialized area of the hospitality and tourism industry; emphasis is placed on meeting the needs of both the student and the hospitality operation offering the management internship. Students must complete 400 hours of internship work.

 

BS IN HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT
Total Credits 120
Program Cost

Tuition: $ 500.00 per credit

Registration Fee: $ 100.00(Non-Refundable)

Books and Supplies: $ 

Admission Requirements

·         Submit a High School Diploma or a GED

·         Submit a completed Admissions Application,

·         Submit a $100 nonrefundable application fee,

·         Submit an updated Resume,

·         Submit a personal statement that describes the applicant’s professional accomplishments and goals.

·         Copy of valid government issued ID

Program Objective The BS in Health Care Administration degree features investigative and experiential opportunities in teamwork and leadership. The student will have the opportunity to gain an in-depth understanding of the organization and structure of the health care sector. The implementation of successful management strategies within the industry along with the managerial skills needed to work in teams, lead teams, build cross-functional teams, and facilitate collaborative decision making are also topics of focus.
Program Description This health care administration degree emphasizes both the conceptual and analytical skills required to manage in contemporary health care organizations. Graduates may be prepared for administrative positions in hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, outpatient facilities, physician offices, mental health organizations, insurance companies, public health agencies, government health departments, and other types of health organizations.

 

 

Program Course Descriptions
Course Number Course Title
ARH 250 ART HISTORY * (3 credits)

The course provides students with a general foundation in sequential and thematic knowledge of the great moments in Art, Architecture, and Culture throughout history, from the earliest times to the present.

ENC 120 COLLEGE COMPOSITION I * (3 credits)

ENC 120 is a college-level writing course that introduces students to various forms of academic discourse. Students are required to prepare essays in a variety of rhetorical modes, including exposition, description and argumentation. In addition to out-of-class writing assignments, students will be required to compose in-class essays in response to readings and other prompts. ENC 120 introduces students to process-writing techniques, library research and APA documentation procedures. The primary focus of ENC 120 is to help students acquire the writing skills they need to succeed in an academic environment.

ENC 121 COLLEGE COMPOSITION II * (3 credits)

ENC 121 is the sequel to ENC 120. This course concentrates on argumentative writing and requires students to prepare a major research report, one that reveals fluency with argumentative strategies and rhetorical conventions. In addition, students are introduced to analytical reading techniques, critical research methods and current documentation procedures. Although other kinds of writing are commonly assigned in ENC 121, argumentation remains the major focus of study.
Prerequisite(s): ENC 120

ENV 101 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE * (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to the scientific aspects of the environmental field. The first part of the course introduces students to the foundations of environmental science, while the second part concentrates on the application of these foundations to real life environmental problems. Therefore, the course not only engages the fundamentals of environmental science but also shows students how science informs sustainability, environmental policies, economics and personal choice.

GEO 200 WORLD GEOGRAPHY * (3 credits)

This course examines the implications of global location and topography for the people of planet Earth. Students will explore how geography shapes the dynamics of human societies, with an emphasis on the geo environmental, geopolitical, and geo social phenomena that help to define the modern world.

HSA 200 BASICS OF HEALTH CARE PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of the current state of the quality movement in Health Care. A public health perspective as well as an individual perspective will be considered from both a U. S. and international view. Relevant history, current gurus, landmark publications, theories, tools, and environmental factors will be discussed and utilized. We will explore the cost/quality connection and analyze the complex forces that shape or hinder the transformation of health care from the current state to a person centered quality focused Health Care System.

HSA 220 HEALTHCARE DATA MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course examines the design and the use of medical databases. Students will learn how to implement business rules and data modeling to develop medical information management systems. The course further explores database applications for decision support including evidence-based practice, alerts, allergy management, and identification of gaps in care. Students will design databases and systems that reflect privacy and security requirements of HIPAA and HITECH Act.

HSA 230 HEALTH PROMOTION (3 credits)

Health Promotion is a problem based course designed to give students an overview of health promotion issues, explore selected current topics in health and health policy from a national and global perspective and investigate the consequences these issues have for the health status of individuals, populations and society. This course will provide the theoretical foundation to look at issues to change health behaviors. Healthy People 2020 and the national health agenda will be explored. The concepts of health literacy, consumer advocacy and their impact of health promotion will be explored.

HSA 240 CODING AND CLASSIFICATION SYSTEMS (3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the basic ability to identify nomenclatures and classification systems as well as assign codes using the appropriate principles, guidelines and conventions and apply ICD-9-DN and ICD conventions rules and guidelines.

HSA 250 CODING AND CLASSIFICATIONS SYSTEMS II (3 credits)

The Communication and technologies course will review and evaluation an assortment of technologies including: data, information, and file structures (data administration, data definitions, data dictionary, data modeling, data structures, data warehousing, database management systems), system interoperability, data sharing, Health Information Exchanges (HIE), and the Nation-wide Health Information Infrastructure (NHIN).
Prerequisite(s): HSA 240

HSA 260 HEALTHCARE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES (3 credits)

This course will provide students with an understanding of the five principles of management as they relate to the health care industry. Particular attention will be paid to planning, organizing, staffing, controlling, and leadership within the different types of health care organizations. Students will also compare and contrast non-profit versus for-profit health care organizations.

HSA 270 HEALTH AND DISEASE (3 credits)

This course examines human health and disease from a biological perspective. It will also explore the evolution of microbes and human disease and the influences that regular exercise, diet, and genetic factors have on every day good health. The course will also explore mechanisms, manifestations, and prevention of common diseases, such as heart disease and cancer.

HSA 280 HISTORY OF HEALTHCARE WORLDWIDE (3 credits)

Students will have the opportunity to follow the strategic trends of the health care industry since its entry into the business arena. An assessment of post-World War II changes in health care, managed care, and managed competition will be addressed. Changes in incentives for physicians, hospitals, and health care providers will be discussed. An assessment of new technology and techniques introduced into the health care industry will also be addressed.

HSA 290 QUALITY AND RISK MANAGEMENT IN HEALTHCARE (3 credits)

This course will provide an introduction to the concept of risk management in health care settings. The course will provide a historical perspective on the development of health care risk management, the role of the health care risk manager, the principles of health care risk management and the connection between risk management, quality improvement and corporate compliance in various health care settings.

HSA 300 MANAGED CARE AND HEALTH INSURANCE (3 credits)

A pragmatic examination of the theories for and uses of managed health in a complex society.  Managed Medicaid and Medicare are discussed as well as a special emphasis on financial contract negotiations.

HSA 310 FACILITIES MANAGEMENT IN THE HEALTHCARE ENVIRONMENT (3 credits)

A study of continuous quality improvement, utilization management, and risk management in health care. Also includes study of credentialing, accreditation standards, quality improvement organizations, and medical staff services. Selected management topics specific to health information departments will be covered.

HSA 330 COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES FOR LEADERS (3 credits)

This course introduces students to leadership studies from a communication perspective. Leadership will be considered in a variety of contexts, including group leadership, for-profit and non-profit organizational leadership, and elected and non-elected public leadership. Through all course activities (e.g., readings, discussion, and case studies) students will gain a broad understanding of how leadership emerges and is enacted on a daily basis through communication.

HSA 350 HEALTHCARE DATA MANAGEMENT II (3 credits)

This course describes the use of information technology and the role of HIT professionals in the development of the electronic health record. It introduces the health information infrastructure and systems along with healthcare informatics including: applications, technology, privacy, and security.

HSA 360 PRINCIPLES OF EPIDEMIOLOGY (3 credits)

This course presents the basic principles of epidemiology with particular emphasis on applications in healthcare management. Topics include specific tools of epidemiology used for purposes of planning, monitoring, and evaluating population health. These include identification of disease, measures of incidence and prevalence, study designs, confidence intervals, p-values, statistical interaction, causal inference, and survival analysis. Methods for managing the health of populations using an understanding of the factors that influence population health are discussed. Strategies that health care organizations and systems can use to control these factors are also considered.

HSA 370 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY (3 credits)

This course provides an in-depth study of human pathological processes and their effects on homeostasis. Emphasis is on interrelationships among organ systems in deviations from homeostasis. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a detailed knowledge of pathophysiology. Course topics include the etiology, physical signs and symptoms, prognosis, and complications of commonly occurring diseases and their management.

HSA 390 HEALTHCARE REIMBURSEMENT (3 credits)

This course explores some of the major issues facing health care industry and the effect that public policy and business environment has on a health care organization. Emphasis is on supply and demand theory, reimbursement systems, managed care, DRG prospective payment, insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, governmental regulations, accessibility, eligibility, budgeting and planning. Students learn to use informational and research tools to make effective management decision

HSA 400 ETHICAL AND LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS OF HEALTHCARE (3 credits)

Students in this course examine the role of health care policy and legal, regulatory, and quality control in ethical decision making in healthcare. Students explore concepts and principles of health care policy, legal control, ethical conduct, and regulatory environments and their application to the health care environment. The impact of health care policy and multicultural, socioeconomic, political, legal, and regulatory factors on health care systems is explored.

HSA 410 BEHAVIORS AND CULTURAL ISSUES IN HEALTHCARE (3 credits)

Analysis of problems and issues associated with management of health care organizations and distinguishes between various types of organizations. This course focuses on hospitals, mental care centers, long-term care facilities, managed care organizations, and community clinics. Introduction to special terminology, culture, and behavior patterns that characterize health care with emphasis on implications for administration of health care institutions.

HSA 420 HEALTHCARE QUALITY MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the management of operations and explore how healthcare organizations can use advance methods to improve healthcare processes, delivery, and outcomes. Specific focus will be on analyzing cycle times (e.g., patient wait times), measuring productivity, streamlining process flows, tracking outcomes and performance metrics, and generally improving health management processes and health outcomes. The process improvement will be measured by how it can improve quality of care and safety of healthcare delivery, reduce waste, and reduce costs. The role of technology and innovative approaches in improving continuing quality improvement in healthcare delivery will be presented.

HSA 430 PHARMOCOLOGY (3 credits)

This course introduces the underlying principles of pharmacology and provides a perspective of the historical, regulatory (FDA) and industrial aspects of pharmacological science. This includes overviews of the physiological, biochemical, and anatomical foundations for the interaction of drugs and chemicals with biological systems.

HSA 440 HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT AND FINANCE (3 credits)

This course focuses on the concepts, principles, tools, finances and strategies used in managing operations within a performance improvement model. Students will explore problem solving and decision making models as well as tools and techniques for planning, organizing, directing, controlling, reporting, and improving the productivity and performance of resources within a Health Information Management Department. Additionally, topics will include healthcare finance (payer mix, investment, bond rating, capitalization), bookkeeping, accounting principles, budgeting processes (capital and operating), and cost/benefits analysis.

HSA 450 PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

Study of the methods, concepts, and procedures of project management. Considers team development, accountability, sequencing of events, scheduling, coordination of consultants, budgeting, contract administration, purchasing, and estimating. Relocations and move management will also be reviewed.

HSA 460 SOCIAL & ORGANIZATIONAL ISSUES IN HEALTHCARE (3 credits)

Students will learn the social, ethical and organizational challenges healthcare workers at all levels face with the incorporation of technology into the healthcare setting. Students will study change management strategies, current in the Healthcare Industry, including the impact of introducing or enhancing clinical information systems, while providing quality care, and the effect of these systems on patients and on interdisciplinary teams within the healthcare setting.

HSA 470 ECONOMCIS OF HEALTHCARE (3 credits)

This course provides the student with a rigorous introduction to the micro- and macroeconomic theory to understand the healthcare landscape both from a financing and policy perspective. Topics explored include market behavior; demand theory; production and cost theory; decision-making in competitive and non-competitive markets, Gross Domestic Product determination; unemployment and inflation; and fiscal and monetary policy.

HSA 480 HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT CAPSTONE (3 credits)

The capstone course is the culminating experience for the Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration. This course builds on the concepts of all courses students have taken within the program of study. The capstone course provides students with the opportunity to integrate and synthesize the knowledge and skills acquired throughout their course work in an original comprehensive project, and to assess their level of mastery of the stated outcomes of their degree program in health care administration.

HSA380 HEALTHCARE DELIVERY SYSTEMS (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of the nature, organization, and function of the continuum of health services found in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the interrelation of cultural, economic, political and social aspects of health care delivery at the federal, state and local level. Topics include health care costs, accessibility of services, governmental influence on health care delivery, private industry role in health care, services for the medically indigent and elderly, ethical issues regarding transplants, reproductive technology, end of life decisions and funding.

MAC 105 COLLEGE MATHEMATICS I * (3 credits)

This course provides a general introduction to college mathematics. Students learn the following mathematical concepts in a logical sequence that increases in difficulty as students gain command of a concept: polynomials, equations, inequalities, the straight line, Cartesian coordinates, functions and graphs, systems of linear equations, logarithms and exponentials, matrix algebra, limit of a function, and derivate of a function and integral.

MAC 114 COLLEGE MATHEMATICS II * (3 credits)

This course provides students with the methodologies required to understand the role played by the inductive method in this field of Mathematics. Trigonometric functions, identities and conditional equations, solution of triangles, trigonometric forms of complex numbers are all taught.

MAN 350 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (3 credits)

This course is geared towards two fundamental aspects: a. the introduction of students to the ideas, theories, concepts and approaches of this area of management; and b. the demonstration and guidance of students in the application and implementation of programs and studies in human resources management. Analyzes special problems of forecasting, planning, staffing, and developing human resource management in health care institutions. Explores legal aspects of human resource management and administration in the industry with an emphasis on compliance.

PHI 210 CRITICAL THINKING *  (3 credits)

This course helps students develop strategies for “learning to think” and “thinking for learning”, using a variety of methods and resources to question their thoughts and their ways of expression, the intention behind what they say, its meaning, and its relationship to their beliefs. Students develop an ideological framework for assessing whether they have a solid and legitimate foundation for such thoughts and expressions.

 

PSY 201 INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY * (3 credits)

This course places an emphasis on behavior and the factors that influence it, as well as on describing the cognitive, affective and personality factors that make up behavior. The knowledge acquired by the students in this course will provide them with a holistic view of man and serve as the basis for understanding other courses related to behavioral science.

SLS 100 STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS SEMINAR (3 credits)

SFS100 is designed to assist students with learning skills that are essential for academic success in college. Students will be taught a variety of learning skills and strategies that will enable them to experience success in college classes and beyond. By applying principles taught throughout the semester, students will become independent learners and will maximize their educational experience.

SOC 201 INTRO TO SOCIOLOGY * (3 credits)

Students should understand their role in society and be capable of interpreting the social phenomena surrounding them. This course provides students with a basic understanding of how the society functions, and specifically how groups work.

SPC 260 ORAL COMMUNICATION * (3 credits)This course helps a student develop his or her abilities and skills in expression and the spoken language. Students apply the techniques of oral exposition and learn to distinguish between the different techniques used in organized oral discussions.

PREREQUISITE: ENC 120

STA 240/MAT 240 APPLIED STATISTICS * (3 credits)This is a fundamental course in the application of statistics. In this course, students will learn to apply statistical techniques to a variety of applications in business and the social sciences. Students will learn how to solve statistical problems by hand and through the use of computer software. Topics include probability distribution functions, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing and linear regression.
* GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES                                                                                                           TOTAL: 120